Tag Archives: diner

Neon on the Geo Trail

Midland Family Bowl, 2600 N. 32nd Street, Fort Smith, Arkansas. Photo by Chris Smaglik (May 2018). Used with permission.

The Kingman Club

Kingman Club, 312 Beale Street, Kingman, AZ. Image by Kenny Ventura (May 2018) used with permission.

There is a legend about a blue-collar cricket called “Rickety” and his beautiful wife “Lilly” that were known to chirp from atop the neon sign while the club was being built in 1944.  He was excited by the red and green neon lighty-up martini glasses of the sign and chirped of his passion for fresh food and beer for the working class of the neighborhood.  Lilly passed away at the neighboring Boyd Hotel (now a doctor’s office) and has since roamed the hallways in a green dress, pining for the company of her cricket husband. Rickety can be heard, if you listen closely, calling for his long-ago wife. The Kingman Club has been renamed the House of Hops. H of H boasts a 25-foot​ bar, complete with ice rail, glycol chilled beer lines that chill their 64 beers on tap to a frosty 32 degrees F.

Kingman Club, 312 Beale Street, Kingman, AZ. Image by Kenneth Ventura (May 2018) used with permission.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just about every old neon sign in Tucson has one of my geocaches hidden nearby. Here is a bookmark list of my 58 vintage neon sign geocaches.

Something intangible draws me to these signs, each of which is a unique work of art. Maybe they remind me that there was a life before endless shopping at big box stores; a time when mom and pops ruled and little quaint restaurants run by families were the norm. Life must have been so simple then!

Midland Family Bowl, 2600 N. 32nd Street, Fort Smith, Arkansas. Photo by Chris Smaglik (May 2018). Used with permission.

I recently returned from a 3500 mile geocaching road trip from Cincinnati, Ohio to Tucson Arizona. I was in a minivan with four other avid geocachers like myself (tammy_b), namely 2Sonians, KennyV, tusmke and tugies.  We found so many interesting geocaches and saw amazing and unusual things along the way. Despite being tucked in a van with luggage stowed in the back like a jigsaw puzzle, we all managed to return unscathed and in good spirits. To see more details about our trip, go to the GeoAdventures.fun blog.

If you want to learn about the amazing outdoor hobby of geocaching, click here.

I want to share a few more of my favorite vintage signs that we were lucky enough to spot on the endless highways and the older sections of the cities and towns we visited.  Thanks to my fellow geocachers for spotting these and whipping out the camera! Some of these were caught as we drove by at 40 miles an hour on our way to the next puzzle, earth or virtual cache.

Desert Drugs Walgreen Agency

The original Desert Drugs building has sadly been torn down, but to see a black and white photo of it click here. The sign is currently located on corner of 3rd Street and Andy Devine. Teddy Rochetti and the Henderson family had the foresight to save it when the building was torn down in 2003. The Elmer Graves family had it restored and installed by Legacy Signs.

I wonder if this was one of the first Walgreens Drugs signs. If anyone knows, or has more information on any of these signs, please leave a comment!

Desert Drugs Walgreens Agency, 229 E Andy Devine Ave, Kingman, AZ. Photo by Kenneth Ventura.

Mr. D’s Diner Route 66

Mr D’s Route 66 Diner, 105 Andy Devine Ave, Kingman, Arizona. Photo by Kenneth Ventura (May 2018) Used with permission.

Scott Dunton, local Kingman businessman and president of Route 66 Association of Kingman, stresses the town of Kingman’s ties to the historic Route 66 highway. His father, Roy, began working at Gold Road garage on Route 66 in 1938.  Roy Dunton’s uncle, N.R. Dunton, owned the garage and built Cool Springs in late 1926. The family established Dunton Motors, now a classic vehicle dealership and restoration business, in 1946. Roy is the “D” in Mr. D’z Route 66 Diner.

 

 

 

 

Bill Russell Fine Cars

Bill Russell Fine Cars, Kansas City, Missouri. Image by Chris Smaglik (May 2018). Used with permission.

 

 

 

Bill Russell Fine Cars, Kansas City, Missouri. Image by Chris Smaglik (May 2018). Used with permission.

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